Sunday, 31 July 2011

RHSV and Melbourne Open House 2011

The Melbourne Open House organisation banner outside our front door.

Two cheery MOH Volunteers greeted the visitors in the foyer. 

RHSV Councillor Jane Carolan greeted visitors inside our door.

Visitors having a good look at the Everard Studley Miller exhibition.

Visitors at the trading table in the library.

Wednesday, 27 July 2011

Open House at the Medical Drill Hall 2011

The Royal Historical Society of Victoria is participating in this spectacular showcasing of Melbourne's best-loved buildings.   We will be open for public viewing on Saturday and Sunday, 30-31 July, from 10 am to 4 pm.

This is a wonderful opportunity to have a look at our 1938 art deco building which retains its fine art deco detailing.  The evocative, timber-panelled Officers' Mess will be open for viewing on the first floor. 

Our new exhibition on Everard Studley Miller will add a great deal of interest to a visit to the Drill Hall.  The exhibition concentrates on E Studley Miller's historical and cultural interests, revealing his approach to photography as a tool of historiography and providing some details of his family background and lifestyle.   While drawing mainly on resources held by the RHSV the exhibition is also supported by the National Galley of Victoria, the Ian Potter Museum of Art, the University of Melbourne and the Australian Institute of Archaeology.

Because of the stairs and the lack of a lift, it is not a suitable building for people of limited mobility, though if you can manage two or three stairs, you will be able to view the ground floor and exhibition.

If you want to view a list of all the buildings involved in Melbourne Open House, click here.

Thursday, 14 July 2011

Everard Studley Miller: member, historian, benefactor

House occupied between 1806-1814 by
Arthur Phillip at Bath, Somerset,
Eng., 1924 / E. Studley Miller / RHSV
Collection: AL085-0073

The exhibition concentrates on E Studley Miller's historical and cultural interests, revealing his approach to photography as a tool of historiography and providing some details of his family background and lifestyle.

The above photograph from the RHSV collection is an example of E Studley Miller's individual use of photography to record historical buildings. This is one of a series of photographs he commissioned of places associated with the founders of Australia - in this case Governor Arthur Phillip, the first governor of New South Wales. Phillip returned to England in 1792, and retired from the naval service in 1805. He lived quietly in this Bath house with his wife Isabelle until his death in 1814.

Miller was a benefactor of the National Gallery of Victoria and the Royal Historical Society of Victora, as well as other organisations.

The exhibition can be viewed at the Royal Historical Society of Victoria, 239 A'Beckett Street, Melbourne, Mondays to Fridays between 10 am and 4 pm. Dates: 13 July to 2 September.

Wednesday, 6 July 2011

New in the bookshop

Australian cinema has effectively popularised the Anzac legend. Just how this has been so is explored in this lucid, clear-eyed study. Here's a taste: "While European art developed a dominant myth of the horror and meaninglessness of the war," and some Australian writers interrogated the Anzac myth, "Australia's many war films are almost entirely devoid of irony."

Published by Australian Scholarly Publishing. Available for $34.95 plus postage.

See our full list of publications for sale here.